My son (now 13)  has been raised in an entrepreneurial environment so it doesn’t really surprise me that when his Fiverr account hit 20,000 views per month he asked if I’d like to buy a link – $10 per month or $15 for lifetime.

So when he started following online gamers I was annoyed (from a parenting perspective) but simultaneously curious about why he was so interested in what appeared to me to be a mind numbing use of time.  Afterall, we have chooks that need to be fed and lawns to be mowed, surely he’s rather do that.

For the past few months I’ve watched and listened as he has identified up and coming you tube gamers, donating them free ‘thumbnails’, and created collaborative opportunities with other teens from all over the world.  I’ve been very interested to hear how he understands intricate metrics to know who to watch and connect with, and that he has come to understand what metrics = revenue.

But today he really blew me away when he told me about an online gamer, ” Parker”, (US) who was hosting a gaming a-thon (not that it’s allowed to be called that because that title, along with me speaking about this publicly, or at all is pretty embarrassing).  But a game-a-thon nevertheless to raise money so he can attend a gaming conference that he may, or may not otherwise be able to afford.  Personally, I hope the guy profits enormously through his creativity.

As I write Parker is in the forth of 24 hours of online gaming in order to raise cash for his venture – and raising cash he is.  My son has been calling out donations of $400 plus USD which Parker is rewarding through a variety of rewards – writing their name on his arm, reading out their comments and so forth.  Ahh!  someone just hit the button on a $1K donation !

Parker is using the online tool, “twitch.tv” to broadcast himself playing a game live (livestream I believe).  And he chooses the additional option of a live thumbnail of himself in the top corner of the screen – so you can see his expressions as he games.

Sound mundane?  Well, in theory (my theory) it is.  But when I actually took the time to watch Parker for a little while I discovered that the guy is actually very entertaining.

It’s not only the twitch.tv platform that enables the gamer to reach an audience,  online gamers also use YouTube channels to reach customers broadcasting their pre-recorded streams to the masses.  Parker, for example has a relatively small following of 271,000 which he clocked up in his mere year of broadcasting.

So what does this mean if you are in the business of fundraising?

Well, consider this…

We are based in regional Australia, our internet connection isn’t always great but it’s enough to make this technology work.  My son has a screen open where 5027 people from all over the world are watching Parker play online games, and broadcast films he’s made and simultaneously donating to him via a simple PayPal link.

Let your mind run through the possibilities now.

Because they are immense…

Note:  above-mentioned son generously donated his time to teach me these gaming terms, I am on notice though of a future fee for information sharing arrangement.

Oh! would you like to join me for a free webinar ‘hot tips for fundraising this Wednesday (25th February) 12-1 AEDT?  Join us via this link

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